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Let’s expand your mind via the comfort of your own home. We’ve scoured the latest in multimedia to come up with some suggestions on new ways to relax. 

Listen: Bedtime stories 

Who says that bedtime stories are only for kids? The latest trend in audio is short stories aimed at helping adults get to sleep. Meditation apps such as Breathe have started incorporating recordings of bedtime stories alongside its meditation guides. The Calm app features celebrities including LeVar Burton and Matthew McConaughey reading soothing tales. And The Get Sleepy podcast features new stories twice a week that often run up to an hour long. Sure sounds better than staring at social media until eventually nodding off. 

Read: Move, Connect, Play by Jason Nemer

Time to get a little more adventurous with your yoga routine. Acroyoga is a mix of yoga and acrobatics. It’s a little like Cirque du Soleil—but don’t let that scare you. Acroyoga International founder Jason Nemer explains the technique in a new book coming out this month called Move, Connect, Play. If the book sparks your interest, head over to acroyoga.org for some guided sessions. You’ll want to grab a partner, too; once you get comfortable enough, you’ll be balancing each other like a mini circus act. 

Stream: ‘Headspace’ on Netflix

Popular meditation app Headspace made the move to streaming last year. Three separate series debuted on Netflix extolling the virtues of rest: “Headspace Guide to Meditation,” “Headspace Guide to Sleep” and “Headspace Unwind Your Mind.” The last series is what’s called an “interactive experience,” in which you can choose exactly how you’d like to unwind, and the program provides your path to get there. Not sure if binge-worthy is the right way to put it—though in the long run, it may be more beneficial to your mental health than, say, “Selling Sunset.” But who are we to judge? 

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