What’s Not in a Name?

Maserati's modest marvel, the MC20

SUPERCAR STYLING The new Maserati MC20 features a skilled interior designer’s signature with a two-toned exterior.

Italian carmakers’ lyrical names define what automotive art on four wheels should be called. Is there a better-named vehicle in the supercar stratosphere than the Maserati Quattroporte Trofeo? So it’s somewhat ironic that the Bologna-founded and Modena-based manufacturer’s first supercar in 16 years has a mundane name. Meet the 2021 Maserati MC20.

The MC20 stands for Maserati Corse 2020, and celebrates the brand’s return to racing. A mid-engine supercar, the new Maserati succeeds the MC12, but the two relatives share little beyond the carmaker’s name and a mid-engine design.

Not since 2005 has Maserati debuted a new supercar, with the MC20 the fourth mid-engine production vehicle in the carmaker’s 107-year history. The Bora (1971- 1978), Merak (1972-1983) and MC12 (2004-2005) also featured the unique configuration that enhances the vehicle’s overall traction.

Presented as a two-seat coupe or convertible, the Maserati is still naturally aspirated. But even old-style carmakers will make concessions to rapidly advancing technology and environmental concerns: A plug-in, all-electric MC20 is on the horizon this year. The all-wheel-drive variant is expected to have a 240-mile range and accelerate quicker than its gas stablemate.

Constructed with carbon fiber and aluminum, the MC20 offers supercar performance. It’s propelled with an eight-speed, dual-clutch automatic transmission and has a top speed of 202 mph.

Beyond their Italian heritage, Maserati vehicles are renowned for their top-line interior craftsmanship and engine growl. A Maserati’s vocal harmonics are amplified in Sport driving mode and when the adaptive suspension and the responsiveness are sharpened. No other car has an engine growl so pleasantly prominent. You can hear the beast arriving from long distance, and it’s great.

The new Maserati, like all of its siblings, has a skilled interior designer’s signature. The steering wheel is made from carbon fiber and micro-suede. The dash is minimalist, featuring a 10-inch display. A second screen showcases the full complement of infotainment functions. Maserati features Alcantara trim with blue accents. The carmaker’s tradition of detailed stitching is omnipresent. Six exterior paint colors are offered, all two-toned-like saddle shoes with a black carbon roof.

Supercars aren’t family haulers, but the MC20 has sufficient room for two occupants who enter and exit via butterfly doors. Don’t expect to carry much; the Maserati has only 5.3 cubic feet of cargo space.
What Maserati didn’t do with its new supercar is impressive. No fancy marketing claims or boastful cliches. The MC20 will let its performance and beauty speak for itself. It has plenty to say without a fancy name.

 

  
Photos courtesy Maserati